Local McDonald’s Franchise Owner Offers 21 Scholarships to Employed Students Across Monterey County

Mohamed Abdulla is a prospective third-year student at California State University at Monterey Bay majoring in molecular biology and minoring in business. Her dream is to be a medical assistant and give back to her local community here in Salinas. “It’s kind of personal why I want to be in the medical field; my grandmother had a medical problem. For us, I felt like I could do nothing to help her. That’s why I want to enter the medical profession and be more useful to my family and loved ones,” Abdulla said. Abdulla came to the United States in 2012 from Yemen. He attended Everett Alvarez High School and is the first in his family to attend university. After applying for over a hundred scholarships, this was the only scholarship he was able to acquire right out of high school. I am also a first generation student It means a lot. It certainly means a lot,” Abdulla said. Mohamed is no stranger to community service. He was president of his high school’s Interact club and involved in Rotary at California State University at Monterey Bay. He has worked at McDonald’s for many years and won a combined $15,000 from the Raymond Costa Family Scholarship Foundation.” These guys work really hard. I respect each of them. Sometimes we can make 130 to 140 transactions per hour: it’s like two per minute. It’s quick. They work hard, you know,” Raymond Costa said. Costa is a McDonald’s franchisee with nine restaurants serving more than 4 million people in Salinas and Salinas Valley per year. Costa gives in other ways; every year he makes a generous donation to the Telethon KSBW’s annual Share Your Holiday, benefiting the Salvation Army, are first-generation college kids. Costa also notes that a large majority are Hispanic and Latino. “Almost all of our crew goes to school somewhere. And we sent kids to UC Davis last year in Berkeley, San Diego, Hartnell, and (California State University in Monterey Bay), and they’re improving their lives. And I’m happy to be part of it. Every year, we look forward to announcing new applicants and people who have been awarded the scholarship. Sometimes it’s the only scholarship they get from me and our foundation,” Costa said. This year, they gave 21 scholarships to students or children of employees to attend college. , for amounts ranging from $1,500 to $5,000. The money goes directly to colleges or universities, ensuring that the money goes towards tuition. For Costa, it’s personal. Having grown up working in the fields and having lost his father at a young age, he makes it his mission to give back to others who remind him of himself. “I come from working in the fields. I was moving the garden hose, so I’m just lucky the companies here can afford to donate that money, and I love helping people. That’s just kind of what we’re doing here. If someone comes and needs something, we try to help in any way we can,” Costa said. Abdulla describes his future and college as an adventure and says he couldn’t. achieve his dreams without the likes of Costa Costa said he would keep giving back until he couldn’t anymore.

Mohamed Abdulla is a prospective third-year student at California State University at Monterey Bay majoring in molecular biology and minoring in business. Her dream is to be a doctor’s assistant and give back to her local community here in Salinas.

“It’s kind of personal why I want to be in the medical field; my grandmother had a medical problem. For us, I felt like there was nothing I could do to help her. That’s why I want to enter the medical profession and be more useful to my family and loved ones,” Abdulla said.

Abdulla came to the United States in 2012 from Yemen. He attended Everett Alvarez High School and is the first in his family to attend college. Applying for over a hundred scholarships, this was the only scholarship he was able to acquire straight out of high school.

“It kind of touched me in a way that was like the stepping stone for me to go to college. To do something my parents never did. I’m also a first generation student It means a lot. It definitely means a lot,” Abdulla said.

Mohamed is no stranger to community service. He was president of his high school Interact club and involved in Rotary at California State University at Monterey Bay. He worked at McDonald’s for many years and won a combined $15,000 from the Raymond Costa Family Scholarship Foundation.

“These guys work really hard. I respect every single one of them. Sometimes we can do 130-140 trades per hour: it’s like two per minute. That’s fast. They work hard, you know,” Raymond said. Coast.

Costa is a McDonald’s franchisee with nine restaurants serving over 4 million people in Salinas and Salinas Valley annually. Costa gives otherwise; each year he makes a generous donation to KSBW’s annual Share Your Holiday Telethon, benefiting the Salvation Army.

Since 2017, the Raymond H. Costa Family Scholarship Fund has awarded more than $343,000 in scholarships to 120 employees, many of whom, like Abdulla, are first-generation college students. Costa also notes that a large majority are Hispanic and Latino.

“Almost our entire team goes to school somewhere. And we sent kids to UC Davis last year in Berkeley, San Diego, Hartnell, and (California State University in Monterey Bay), and they’re improving their lives. And I am happy Every year we look forward to announcing new applicants and people who have been awarded the scholarship, and sometimes it is the only scholarship they receive from me and our foundation,” Costa said.

This year, they awarded 21 scholarships to employed students or children of employees to attend college, for amounts ranging from $1,500 to $5,000. The money goes directly to colleges or universities, ensuring that the money goes to tuition.

For Costa, it’s personal. Having grown up working in the fields and having lost his father at a young age, he makes it his mission to give back to others who remind him of himself.

“I had just worked in the fields. I used to move the garden hose, so I know what it’s like. I’m just lucky that the companies here can afford to give away that money , and I love helping people. That’s just kind of what we do here. If somebody comes in and needs something, we try to help in any way we can,” Costa said.

Abdulla describes his future and college education as an adventure and says he couldn’t achieve his dreams without people like Costa. Costa said he would keep giving back until he couldn’t anymore.

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